Users Are More Engaged With Social Media on Fridays


Not getting the traction you were hoping for with your social media efforts? It could simply mean that you’re updating on the wrong day of the week! Two separate pieces of research out this week show that the end of the work week is the best time to get traction on status updates and tweets.

Analyzing more than 200 of its clients’ Facebook pages over a 14-day period, Buddy Media found that engagement on Thursdays and Fridays was 18% higher than the rest of the week, and that engagement was actually even better on Thursday than on Friday. As well, Twitter Chief Revenue Officer Adam Bain — speaking at the Ad Age Digital conference earlier this week — said that Twitter users are more engaged with tweets on Fridays.

And if you think about it, it only makes sense. Towards the end of the week people are mentally checking out and transitioning to the weekend – so they’re thinking about things besides work. Social media is the perfect outlet to check out what friends are doing, what events may be occurring, and all the things in general that are going on outside the work-world!

The fact that Thursdays and Fridays are the best days of the week for engagement isn’t yet common knowledge among marketers. As Buddy Media CEO Michael Lazerow also noted at the Ad Age Digital conference, most brands are similarly unaware that their status updates will get more pickup if they’re posted after work hours.

But what’s generally true may not be applicable to many marketers, anyway. If the B2B audience is checking out mentally on Friday, then it may not be the best time to post. Similarly, Lazerow said that for movie companies, the weekend is the prime time, but for other media companies, Monday is the worst day of the week. “It’s the noisiest time to post,” Lazerow said.

So really, be strategic with your posts. Think about who you might be directing your information towards, and don’t post your “epic news” on a Monday morning if you know your audience is going to be head-down at their desks.

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